5 reasons to visit Pancake Bay Provincial Park

Never visited Lake Superior?

Let us introduce you to this stunning body of water with a park that showcases how great this lake is: Pancake Bay Provincial Park!

If you’re travelling from the east or south, Pancake Bay is the first provincial park with camping you’ll come across on Superior.

Located less than an hour north of Sault Ste. Marie, this park is perfect to start or cap off your Lake Superior adventures.

Check out these five reasons to visit Pancake Bay Provincial Park:

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An outsider’s view on the importance of Anishinaabemowin

Today’s post comes from retired Quetico Provincial Park biologist Brian Jackson. 

Anishinaabemowin is the traditional name for the language of the Anishinaabeg or Ojibway people who have lived for centuries on the land now known as Quetico Provincial Park.

In recent years, Quetico has taken steps to incorporate more Anishinaabemowin into educational material for the park.

Examples include the “Animals of Quetico in Anishinaabemowin” brochure available from entry stations, or the new Anishinaabemowin/Ojibway lake names display we are working on that will go into the Dawson Trail Pavilion.

But why should learning more about Anishinaabemowin be important to non-Indigenous people like myself who know very little of this beautiful language?

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The storm that changed Bon Echo

Today’s post comes from Sarah Wray, a Discovery Leader at Bon Echo Provincial Park.

When a massive derecho storm tore a path through Ontario on May 21, 2022, Bon Echo Provincial Park was directly in its path.

What is a derecho? It’s a long-lived, fast-moving thunderstorm with straight line winds that cause widespread damage. With this type of storm, the worst of it comes within a couple minutes of it hitting.

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What types of wildlife might I see at Ontario Parks?

If you’re new to Ontario Parks, you might be a little nervous about the animals that call our parks home.

Many of us live in cities or suburbs, with little interaction with wildlife, so we don’t know how to react or behave. We want your parks experience to be fun and safe, both for you and for the wildlife that live here.

Today, let’s talk about:

  • the types of critters you might encounter at Ontario Parks
  • some simple tips to prevent negative wildlife interactions

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How to practice proper pumpkin etiquette in parks

Today’s blog comes from Jessica Stillman, school outreach coordinator at Bronte Creek Provincial Park. In the fall, if she isn’t outside with students learning about mushrooms or how animals prepare for winter, she’s inside baking up a pumpkin treat!

Spooky season is upon us!

It’s time for cobwebs, witches, and skeletons to adorn our lawns and porches. Who doesn’t love admiring the creative carving of a jack-o-lantern, its toothy grin lit by a flickering flame?

These hauntingly fun decorations are part of the Halloween spirit, but what happens to them once November 1 rolls around?

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How environmental health professionals keep our water safe

You’re all packed up and ready for another weekend outdoors.

You’ve got your sleeping bags, full cooler, sunscreen, and swimsuit.

Maybe you’ll fill your trailer’s water tank up once you arrive, a water container or two for the campsite, then head to the beach to cool off.

But have you ever stopped to think about how we keep the water safe for you to drink, take a warm shower in, or cool off in at the beach?

Environmental public health professionals do proactive, science-based work behind the scenes to ensure your environment is safe, so you don’t have to worry and can enjoy the moments that really matter.

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The splendor of Terra Firma meets the majesty of the heavens: Geology and planetary science in action

Today’s post comes from Dr. Gordon (Oz) Osinski, Professor of Planetary Geology/Earth and Planetary Materials Western University [1] and Bruce Waters, former educator at the McLaughlin Planetarium and founder of the Killarney Provincial Park Observatory. [2]

Have you ever come to a beautiful beach and marveled at the spectacular pebbles scattered before you?

They seem to be of every colour, shape, and size imaginable.

And if you look up close with a magnifying loop, you may even see additional details like fossils and crystals!

Those pebbles can tell the trained eye an incredible story of how they formed, what has happened to them since, and how they ended up in front of you. It’s a story that can be billions of years in the making and involve incredible forces of nature.

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5 reasons to try late fall camping

It’s not time to say goodbye to your favourite park just yet!

While some of our parks close after Thanksgiving Weekend, many remain open through late fall and even through the winter.

If you’ve never tried a late fall camping trip, this might be the perfect opportunity to make the most of the season before packing up for the winter.

Here are five reasons to try late fall camping:

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Falling for campsite crafting

Today, Content Development Specialist Andrea Coulter takes us through some family-friendly fall crafts. 

Last fall, my kids and I joined my parents on a three generation camping trip to Canisbay Lake Campground in Algonquin Provincial Park.

We spent our days going for bike rides, hiking, and visiting around the campfire, but my kids’ creative bug was definitely itching. I was glad I had prepared some activities for around the campsite!

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5 reasons to visit Fushimi Lake Provincial Park

Fushimi Lake Provincial Park is located in the heart of Ontario’s boreal forest, near the town of Hearst just north of Highway 11.

That’s a long way from some parts of Ontario, but it sure is worth the visit!

From a big lake jumping with fish, to the big night skies filled with stars and the faces of staff with big smiles, this park is really something you need to experience!

Here are five reasons to visit Fushimi Lake:

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